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New Zealand

Mexico

U.S.A.

Official Languages English, Maori, and N.Z. Sign Language Spanish + 68 indigenous Amerindian languages none declared, though English is most common
Money Dollars ($) Pesos ($) Dollars ($)
  Coinage 10, 20, 50, $1, $2 5c, 10c, 20c (though not used much)
$1, $2, $5, $10
1, 5, 10, 25, 50, $1
  Bills $5, $10, $20, $50, $100 $10, $20, $50, $100, $500, $1000 $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100
Electricity (wiki article) 230 Volt, 50 Hz
uses 2 or 3 flat prongs, top two being slanted toward each other, and 3rd one is vertical
127 Volt, 60 Hz
uses same plug as USA
120 Volt, 60 Hz
uses 2 flat vertical and 1 round prongs
  Wall Outlets each outlet has its own on/off switch same as in USA Older homes have just two prongs, missing a hole for the round grounding prong.  Modern homes have three holes for plug, no switches.
  Light Switches Flip DOWN to turn on, up to turn off.
Wall outlet switches are the same.
Flip up to turn on, down to turn off. Flip up to turn on, down to turn off.
Water Outlets (Taps) Hot water is most commonly on RIGHT side, cold on left, though many newer homes are reversing this. Hot water is on left side, cold on right. Hot water is on left side, cold on right.
  Water drains Supposedly, water in the southern hemisphere swirls in the opposite direction from that in the northern hemisphere, specifically, counter-clockwise (or as they say in NZ, anti-clockwise) in the southern hemisphere.  This is an urban myth.  I've watched our bathtub drain many times, and it is about half and half as to which direction it swirls as it drains. <---- see entry under New Zealand. <---- see entry under New Zealand.
Government Type Parliamentary Democracy - a political system in which the legislature (parliament) selects the government - a prime minister, premier, or chancellor along with the cabinet ministers - according to party strength as expressed in elections; by this system, the government acquires a dual responsibility: to the people as well as to the parliament. Federal Republic - a state in which the powers of the central government are restricted and in which the component states retain a degree of self-government; ultimate sovereign power rests with the voters who chose their governmental representatives. Federal Republic - a state in which the powers of the central government are restricted and in which the component states retain a degree of self-government; ultimate sovereign power rests with the voters who chose their governmental representatives.
Cars and Driving Drive on left side of road.
Call fuel for cars "petrol".
Drivers are very courteous.
Until March 2012, when turning left, you must yield to the person turning across traffic to turn right.
Many roundabouts (traffic circles).  In fact, some towns are very proud about having zero traffic signals.  This actually does seem to speed up the flow of traffic.
Drive on right side of road.
Call fuel for cars "petrol".
Most people ignore turn signals, and driving is mostly a matter of ***forcing your way.
Glorietas (traffic circles, roundabouts) are common for some larger intersections, but there are usually signals in the glorietas, both for entering and while you are circulating.  This seems to cause more traffic than a simple traffic signal system with no glorieta.
Drive on right side of road.
Call fuel for cars "gas" or "gasoline".
Traffic circles (roundabouts) are rare, though they are increasing in number.  Traffic signals (aka, stop lights), however, are ubiquitous, even in places where you can sit and wait for a couple minutes with no cross traffic whatever.
People Very friendly and open and helpful.  The people we've met in NZ seem to be much more exuberant about life in general, taking time to enjoy life, being laid back, and living a slower paced life than many people in the USA.  There seems to be MUCH less stress here in NZ than in USA, probably because the lifestyle is more relaxed. Mostly friendly and helpful. Friendly in small groups, less so in larger groups.
Clothing Style More casual, often wearing stubbies (very short shorts) while transacting business around town.  Business people, on the other hand, will often dress up even to wearing ties.  Retail proprietors usually fall in between these. Overall, people dress more formally in Mexico, though there are certainly exceptions, as in other countries. All types of clothing styles, probably depending on location and ***purpose/surroundings/?.
  Clothing Zippers I am surprised to find that jackets and other clothing for men have the zipper on LEFT side.
Female jackets have zipper on right side.
Male jackets have zipper on right side.
Female jackets have zipper on left side.
Male jackets have zipper on right side.
Female jackets have zipper on left side.
       
Saying "Thank you" "Ta".  or "cheers", though "cheers has multiple meanings, including saying "goodbye". "gracias".  or showing a person the back of your hand, which in the USA looks like an insult. "thanks", "thank you", sometimes "gracias" when one is being casual or slightly silly.

 


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