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Herradura and Tequila

We took a tour of the Herradura Tequila plant and thoroughly enjoyed it.  The tour costs sixty pesos each (approximately four and a half dollars US at the time).

agave hearts at Casa Herradura, tequila processing plant
Casa Herradura, tequila processing plant
Casa Herradura, tequila processing plant

The process begins with cooking the agave hearts for two days, after which the juices are squeezed from the plant.

Andrew Wharton at Casa Herradura, tequila processing plant
distillation at Casa Herradura, tequila processing plant

The juices are then put into very large tanks to ferment for a few days, after which it is distilled twice to get the tequila alcohol.  The alcohol content is too high at this point; so, Herradura adds some water to thin it out.

Some of the Herradura tequila is then sold as "Tequila Blanco", and some of the Herradura tequila is aged to produce the "Reposada" (aged 3 to 12 months), the "Anejo" (aged up to 3 years), and the "Suprema Seleccion" (aged 3 to 5 years).

various tequilas at Casa Herradura, tequila processing plant
aging barrels for tequila at Casa Herradura, tequila processing plant
Queso Fundillo (bowl of cheese) -- yummy -- at Tequila, Mexico

After our tour, we drove downtown Tequila and ate lunch.  Andrew had the Sopa Azteca (Aztec soup), and Dave had Queso Fundillo (literally, a bowl of melted cheese).  We both enjoyed our meals immensely.

Andrew Wharton eats his Sopa Azteca in Tequila, Mexico
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